Previous semesters’ programmes

Autumn 2020 schedule:

Spring 2021:

14 January: TalkAndrea: “The articulation of the Aarhusian stød” NB! This talk takes place at 14:15

27 January (WED, 1:15-2pm): TalkJonas: “Production and perception of the SBE hot-hut vowel contrast by L1 Danish learners of English before and after high variability phonetic training”.

3 February (WED, 1:15-2pm): Organisational meeting! Bring your ideas for papers, talks and other phun things for the semester to come!

10 February (Wed, 1:15-2pm). Reading group. Phonology papers. Read either or both of the following:

18 February (Thur, 2:15-3pm): Guest talk. Oliver Niebuhr (University of Southern Denmark) – “Why it matters to be a charismatic speaker: ‘Phun’ analyses from SDU students and beyond”.

24 February (Wed, 1:15-2pm) Talk. Paul Boersma (visiting AU) – “Phonological features emerge substance-freely from the phonetics and the morphology”.

4 March (Thur, 2:15-3pm) Guest talk. Agnes Mikkelsen (University of Copenhagen). Topic: her BA on attitudes to the speech of drag queens.

9th March (14:15-15:00) PhD talk. Krestina: “Digital transmission – What is it and why do we care from a linguistic perspective?” PhD talks take place on their own Zooms. Phon phunners will receive the relevant link by email a few days before the talk. Interested non-phunners, please ask Anna to forward the link

10 March (Wed, 1:15-2) Talk. Kirstine Boas & Silke Flodin (AU). Topic: Tonal stød in Funen.

16th March (Tue, 15:00-16:00pm): Voice talk. Sofia Navarro (AU) gives a talk on her BA thesis: “The role of voice quality in the perception of vocal affect: An empirical study.” This talk is part of the interdisciplinary Voice project, and is accessible through the Voice zoom: https://aarhusuniversity.zoom.us/j/65644869592

18 March (Thur, 2:15-3pm) Reading group. We’ll be reading the following paper on tone change:

24 March (Wed, 1:15-2pm) Talk. Camilla and Silke Hamann (visiting AU)“Phonotactic restrictions in L2 acquisition of final plosives: a neutral network account”.

7 April (Wed, 1:15-2pm) Guest talk. Timo Roettger (University of Oslo). “The credibility revolution in the speech sciences”. Read Timo’s abstract here:

Large-scale attempts to replicate published studies across the quantitative sciences have uncovered surprisingly low replication rates. This discovery has led to what is now referred to as the “replication crisis”. Since our understanding of human language is increasingly shaped by quantitative data, there are raising concerns that a similar state of affairs is true for quantitative linguistics because it shares with other disciplines many research practices that decrease the replicability of published findings. In this talk, I will have a closer look at quantitative linguistics in general and the speech sciences in particular. I will suggest promising ways forward to increase the transparency, reproducibility, and replicability of our work. Moreover, I will offer actionable solutions that can help us create a more robust empirical foundation of quantitative linguistics and aid us in saving time and resources.

15 April (Thur, 2:15-3pm) Guest Talk. Nicolai Pharao (Copenhagen University, DK). “Attempts at describing the tonal stress group in Copenhagen Multiethnolect – why bother?”

22 April (Thur, 2:15-3pm) Guest talk. Jasper Hong Sim (Cambridge, UK) – “Variation in English /l/ in the child-directed speech of English-Malay bilinguals in Singapore”.

28 April (Wed, 1:15-2pm) Guest talk. Marina Cantarutti (Open University, UK) – “A multimodal approach to the study of phonetics as a resource for managing participant problems in interaction: Opportunities and challenges”.

In this talk, I will explore some of the opportunities, challenges, and “uncomfortable truths” that an understanding of phonetics within a multimodal view of language in and as (inter)action can offer to the study of phonetic phenomena.  In real interactional situations, participants make use of a wealth of resources at their disposal and weave them in particular ways to orient to the demands of their communicative contexts and to basically “get things done”. This poses important questions on the study of phonetics when trying to pin down pragmatic functions of particular phonetic features, as well as for determining what makes particular instances of phenomena count as part of the same collection (Ogden & Cantarutti, submitted).  By describing some of the tenets, methods, and findings of the phonetics of talk-in-interaction (Couper-Kuhlen & Selting, 1996; Local and Walker, 2012; Ogden, 2021) and my own research on collaborative practices (Cantarutti, 2020; Szczepek-Reed, 2006; Lerner, 1996,  2002, 2004), I will show how phonetics interacts with other resources to deal with the temporal and incremental reality of talk-in-interaction, and primarily to solve the concurrent participation, turn and sequence organisation, and stance projection problems that co-participants routinely face and smoothly manage. I will provide evidence for why it might make sense to adopt a parametric approach (Abercrombie, 1964; Local & Walker, 2005) that sees strands of phonetic detail as part of positionally-sensitive and multimodal gestalts/constructions (Ogden, 2010; Mondada, 2018) where phonetics, gesture and lexico-grammar interact in meaningful ways. I will propose that by focusing on gestalts and on participant orientation and co-creation processes of interwoven semiotic resources rather than only on individual features, and by doing so by attending to the location of these resources as much as their design, we can gain a more complete understanding of how phonetics contributes to action production and ascription in interaction “in the wild”.

5 May (Wed, 1:15-2pm) Guest talk. Robert Lennon (University of Lancaster, UK). “Comparing Scottish and English listeners’ perception of ambiguous rhoticity”.

11th May (14:15-15:00). PhD talk. Jonas: “A preliminary investigation into the production and perception of the SBE vowel contrast in lot-strut by L1 Danish learners of English”. PhD talks take place on their own Zooms. Phon phunners will receive the relevant link by email a few days before the talk. Interested non-phunners, please ask Anna to forward the link

12 May (Wed, 9:15 and going on for two to three hours): Workshop. Adrian Leemann (University of Bern, CH): “Using smartphones and web-apps for phonetic data collection: benefits and pitfalls”. Phonetic data collection typically involves conducting interviews with participants in close proximity. The safety precautions related to the COVID-19 pandemic brought such data collection to an abrupt halt: social distancing forced linguistic fieldwork into involuntary hibernation. There is an obvious workaround though: we can use smartphones and web-apps for remote data collection. Todays devices are equipped with top-end mics, screens to draw on, cameras etc. – all of which offer exciting opportunities for remote data collection. The problem is: how good is the recording quality of smartphones really? How do devices differ? How well can older speakers navigate smartphones and web-apps (‘computer literacy’)? In this interactive workshop we’ll talk about just that. All welcome – this workshop will run on our normal Phon Phun Zoom Space.

20 May (Thur, 9:00-13) Workshop. Riccardo Fusarolli and Chris Cox (both AU): “What is the deal with Bayesian modeling: a hands-on introduction relying on brms and R”. In this workshop we will interleave lectures and practice to enable you to understand and run Bayesian statistical analyses in R using brms. We will cover a concrete example (possibly vowel hyperarticulation in child directed speech in Danish), following a Bayesian workflow that builds models according to what we know of the problem and doesn’t try to fit data according to the statistical tests we know. This workshop requires some familiarity with R coding and statistical modeling as we won’t have the time to cover all the basics. Attendance is capped – this workshop will run on a separate Zoom – unfortunately we are out of spaces for this workshop!

16 June (Wed, 10:00-13) Workshop. Jalal Al-Tamimi (University of Newcastle, UK): “Introduction to Random Forests.” Random Forests (RF) are increasingly used in the phonetics and linguistics literature as a predictive modelling approach due to their flexibility and overall performance. They can be used on multivariate data to identify strong vs weak predictors. We will start this workshop by (re-)introducing basics of predictive modelling and evaluating group separation using a logistic regression as a classification tool followed by Signal Detection Theory (d prime, sensitivity, specificity and Area Under the Curve). Once the basics are covered, we will introduce decision trees to understand how they work, before growing our first RF model, obtaining predictions, and variable importance scores, obtained via permutation tests. If time allows, we will look at how to fit an RF classification model following the philosophy of TidyModels. At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to fit an RF on their own data. Attendance is capped – this workshop will run on a separate Zoom – unfortunately we are out of spaces for this workshop!

14 January: TalkAndrea: “The articulation of the Aarhusian stød” NB! This talk takes place at 14:15

27 January (WED, 1:15-2pm): TalkJonas: “Production and perception of the SBE hot-hut vowel contrast by L1 Danish learners of English before and after high variability phonetic training”.

3 February (WED, 1:15-2pm): Organisational meeting! Bring your ideas for papers, talks and other phun things for the semester to come!

10 February (Wed, 1:15-2pm). Reading group. Phonology papers. Read either or both of the following:

18 February (Thur, 2:15-3pm): Guest talk. Oliver Niebuhr (University of Southern Denmark) – “Why it matters to be a charismatic speaker: ‘Phun’ analyses from SDU students and beyond”.

24 February (Wed, 1:15-2pm) Talk. Paul Boersma (visiting AU) – “Phonological features emerge substance-freely from the phonetics and the morphology”.

4 March (Thur, 2:15-3pm) Guest talk. Agnes Mikkelsen (University of Copenhagen). Topic: her BA on attitudes to the speech of drag queens.

9th March (14:15-15:00) PhD talk. Krestina: “Digital transmission – What is it and why do we care from a linguistic perspective?” PhD talks take place on their own Zooms. Phon phunners will receive the relevant link by email a few days before the talk. Interested non-phunners, please ask Anna to forward the link

10 March (Wed, 1:15-2) Talk. Kirstine Boas & Silke Flodin (AU). Topic: Tonal stød in Funen.

16th March (Tue, 15:00-16:00pm): Voice talk. Sofia Navarro (AU) gives a talk on her BA thesis: “The role of voice quality in the perception of vocal affect: An empirical study.” This talk is part of the interdisciplinary Voice project, and is accessible through the Voice zoom: https://aarhusuniversity.zoom.us/j/65644869592

18 March (Thur, 2:15-3pm) Reading group. We’ll be reading the following paper on tone change:

24 March (Wed, 1:15-2pm) Talk. Camilla and Silke Hamann (visiting AU)“Phonotactic restrictions in L2 acquisition of final plosives: a neutral network account”.

7 April (Wed, 1:15-2pm) Guest talk. Timo Roettger (University of Oslo). “The credibility revolution in the speech sciences”. Read Timo’s abstract here:

Large-scale attempts to replicate published studies across the quantitative sciences have uncovered surprisingly low replication rates. This discovery has led to what is now referred to as the “replication crisis”. Since our understanding of human language is increasingly shaped by quantitative data, there are raising concerns that a similar state of affairs is true for quantitative linguistics because it shares with other disciplines many research practices that decrease the replicability of published findings. In this talk, I will have a closer look at quantitative linguistics in general and the speech sciences in particular. I will suggest promising ways forward to increase the transparency, reproducibility, and replicability of our work. Moreover, I will offer actionable solutions that can help us create a more robust empirical foundation of quantitative linguistics and aid us in saving time and resources.

15 April (Thur, 2:15-3pm) Guest Talk. Nicolai Pharao (Copenhagen University, DK). “Attempts at describing the tonal stress group in Copenhagen Multiethnolect – why bother?”

22 April (Thur, 2:15-3pm) Guest talk. Jasper Hong Sim (Cambridge, UK) – “Variation in English /l/ in the child-directed speech of English-Malay bilinguals in Singapore”.

28 April (Wed, 1:15-2pm) Guest talk. Marina Cantarutti (Open University, UK) – “A multimodal approach to the study of phonetics as a resource for managing participant problems in interaction: Opportunities and challenges”.

In this talk, I will explore some of the opportunities, challenges, and “uncomfortable truths” that an understanding of phonetics within a multimodal view of language in and as (inter)action can offer to the study of phonetic phenomena.  In real interactional situations, participants make use of a wealth of resources at their disposal and weave them in particular ways to orient to the demands of their communicative contexts and to basically “get things done”. This poses important questions on the study of phonetics when trying to pin down pragmatic functions of particular phonetic features, as well as for determining what makes particular instances of phenomena count as part of the same collection (Ogden & Cantarutti, submitted).  By describing some of the tenets, methods, and findings of the phonetics of talk-in-interaction (Couper-Kuhlen & Selting, 1996; Local and Walker, 2012; Ogden, 2021) and my own research on collaborative practices (Cantarutti, 2020; Szczepek-Reed, 2006; Lerner, 1996,  2002, 2004), I will show how phonetics interacts with other resources to deal with the temporal and incremental reality of talk-in-interaction, and primarily to solve the concurrent participation, turn and sequence organisation, and stance projection problems that co-participants routinely face and smoothly manage. I will provide evidence for why it might make sense to adopt a parametric approach (Abercrombie, 1964; Local & Walker, 2005) that sees strands of phonetic detail as part of positionally-sensitive and multimodal gestalts/constructions (Ogden, 2010; Mondada, 2018) where phonetics, gesture and lexico-grammar interact in meaningful ways. I will propose that by focusing on gestalts and on participant orientation and co-creation processes of interwoven semiotic resources rather than only on individual features, and by doing so by attending to the location of these resources as much as their design, we can gain a more complete understanding of how phonetics contributes to action production and ascription in interaction “in the wild”.

5 May (Wed, 1:15-2pm) Guest talk. Robert Lennon (University of Lancaster, UK). “Comparing Scottish and English listeners’ perception of ambiguous rhoticity”.

11th May (14:15-15:00). PhD talk. Jonas: “A preliminary investigation into the production and perception of the SBE vowel contrast in lot-strut by L1 Danish learners of English”. PhD talks take place on their own Zooms. Phon phunners will receive the relevant link by email a few days before the talk. Interested non-phunners, please ask Anna to forward the link

12 May (Wed, 9:15 and going on for two to three hours): Workshop. Adrian Leemann (University of Bern, CH): “Using smartphones and web-apps for phonetic data collection: benefits and pitfalls”. Phonetic data collection typically involves conducting interviews with participants in close proximity. The safety precautions related to the COVID-19 pandemic brought such data collection to an abrupt halt: social distancing forced linguistic fieldwork into involuntary hibernation. There is an obvious workaround though: we can use smartphones and web-apps for remote data collection. Todays devices are equipped with top-end mics, screens to draw on, cameras etc. – all of which offer exciting opportunities for remote data collection. The problem is: how good is the recording quality of smartphones really? How do devices differ? How well can older speakers navigate smartphones and web-apps (‘computer literacy’)? In this interactive workshop we’ll talk about just that. All welcome – this workshop will run on our normal Phon Phun Zoom Space.

20 May (Thur, 9:00-13) Workshop. Riccardo Fusarolli and Chris Cox (both AU): “What is the deal with Bayesian modeling: a hands-on introduction relying on brms and R”. In this workshop we will interleave lectures and practice to enable you to understand and run Bayesian statistical analyses in R using brms. We will cover a concrete example (possibly vowel hyperarticulation in child directed speech in Danish), following a Bayesian workflow that builds models according to what we know of the problem and doesn’t try to fit data according to the statistical tests we know. This workshop requires some familiarity with R coding and statistical modeling as we won’t have the time to cover all the basics. Attendance is capped – this workshop will run on a separate Zoom – unfortunately we are out of spaces for this workshop!

16 June (Wed, 10:00-13) Workshop. Jalal Al-Tamimi (University of Newcastle, UK): “Introduction to Random Forests.” Random Forests (RF) are increasingly used in the phonetics and linguistics literature as a predictive modelling approach due to their flexibility and overall performance. They can be used on multivariate data to identify strong vs weak predictors. We will start this workshop by (re-)introducing basics of predictive modelling and evaluating group separation using a logistic regression as a classification tool followed by Signal Detection Theory (d prime, sensitivity, specificity and Area Under the Curve). Once the basics are covered, we will introduce decision trees to understand how they work, before growing our first RF model, obtaining predictions, and variable importance scores, obtained via permutation tests. If time allows, we will look at how to fit an RF classification model following the philosophy of TidyModels. At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to fit an RF on their own data. Attendance is capped – this workshop will run on a separate Zoom – unfortunately we are out of spaces for this workshop!


Autumn 2020:

16th September (WED): Organisation meeting. This meeting will, like the rest of the semester’s meetings, be online. Remember, our timeslot is 13:15–14.

21st September (MON): Reading group. We will be reading this paper on language change in appearance of stød.

28th September (MON): Reading group celebrating John Ohala. We’ll be reading this paper: http://linguistics.berkeley.edu/~ohala/papers/means.pdf – If you’re keen, you can also read this paper: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/9781405166201.ch22

5th October (MON): Guest talk. Kamil Kaźmierski – “Prevocalic t-glottaling across word boundaries in Midland American English”. If you’re a Phon Phunner, you can view his talk here.

PhD talk! 6th October, somewhere between 14:15-16:00: Chris with “Interactive Technology & Infant Research: Methodological Considerations”

19th October (MON): Guest talk. Thomas Kettig – “How many vowels does Hawaiian have?” NB! The time for Thomas’ talk will be 11:15–12. If you’re a Phon Phunner, you can view his talk here.

21st October (WED): Talk – Elisabeth Ludovica Lomholdt – “The secret of Alyssa Edwards’ tongue pop: the phonological and pragmatic categorisation of the tongue pop as a (Queer) linguistic marker”. If you’re a Phon Phunner, you can view her talk here.

26th October (MON): Talk. Rasmus – “Looking into stops: Phonological representation below the level of the segment”. If you’re a Phon Phunner, you can view his talk here.

2nd November (MON): Talk. Laura Bisbo – “Gender and the voice: using fundamental frequency and /s/ fronting to express gender identity”. If you’re a Phon Phunner, you can view her talk here.

9th November (MON): Guest talk. Adèle Jatteau – “”Final devoicing before it happens: a large-scale study of word-final obstruents in French”. View her (password protected) talk here.

PhD talks! 10th November, 14:15-16:00: (1st talk); Yonatan, “Towards a natural history of stød” (2nd talk); Johanne Sofie Krog Nedergaard, “Investigating the Inner Voice: Methods & Pitfalls”

*CANCELLED!!!* 11th November (WED): Talk. Andrea – “The articulation of the Aarhusian stød”

18th November (WED): Talk. Camilla –  “Investigating the L2 comprehension of morphophonological alternations in Danish irregular verbs and loanwords”.  View Camilla’s talk here (only for Phon Phunners).

23rd November (MON): Talk. Krestina – “The secrets of LPC”

Conference: 30th November + 1st December: PPDK

2nd December: PhD Defense!!!! Our very own Søren defends his thesis “The Prosody of Response Tokens in Danish”. For more info, and to sign up, click here. NB! Sign up before 1st December.

7th December (MON): Reading group (chapters to be circulated):

  • Flege, J. E. & Bohn, O.-S. 2020. The revised Speech Learning Model (SLM-r). In: Wayland, R., ed., Second language speech learning. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9781108840637
  • Flege, J. E., Aoyama, K. & Bohn, O.-S. 2020. The revised Speech Learning Model (SLM-r) applied. In: Wayland, R., ed., Second language speech learning. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9781108840637

Workshop: 16th December (WED): Principal Components Analysis workshop hosted by Anna. NB! This will be 9-11, on our normal Phon Zoom. Instructions: bring a dataset of your own with at last three numerical variables.


Autumn 2019 schedule:

18/09 – Organisation meeting (526)

02/10 (15:30-16:15) Talk: Martin S. gives a voice acting session. Catharine brings cake. (324)

23/10 – Reading group:  we’re reading the paper “Accents of guilt” by John Dixon and colleagues. Martin brings cake. (526)

29/10 (Tuesday at 14:15)  Talk: Ocke gives a talk about some very preliminary results on Danish accented English. Míša will maybe give a talk on something with Czech and something else. Yonatan brings cake. (Room to be announced).

06/11 (15:30-16:15) Talk: Yonatan gives a talk on Vestjysk stød. Chris brings cake. (324)

13/11 Reading group: we’re reading the paper “Japanese has syllables: a reply to Labrune” by Shigeto Kawahara. A bringer of cake is yet to be found. (324)

20/11 Talk:  Camilla Horslund gives a talk titled “VOT in loanwords in Finnish – evidence for prevoicing of initial /b, d, g/”. Mette brings cake. (526)

27/11 Talk: Frederik  gives a talk on affrication in Welsh English. Cake is brought by Søren. (324)

04/12 Talk: Chris gives a talk under the title “Inside the Infant Mind: the Mutual Interaction between Infants’ Inferential Capacities and Exploratory Behaviour during Language Development”. Cake is possibly brought by Frederik. (526)

09/12 Talk: Rasmus Puggaard gives a talk titled “Variation i udtalen af jyske klusiler: En korpusundersøgelse”. The talk is given at the Peter Skautrup Centre (building 1910 in the basement, Trøjborgvej 88) at 13:00. It includes some really cool GAMM-maps!

11/12 Reading group: we’re reading the paper “Japanese has syllables: a reply to Labrune” by Shigeto Kawahara. Yonatan might be the bringer of cake. (626)


Spring 2019 schedule:

20/02: Reading group: we’re reading a paper by Scobbie and Stuart-Smith on fuzzy categories and contrasts. Mette brings cake.

27/02: Reading group: we’re reading a paper by Fruehwald titled “The early influence on phonology on a phonetic change”. Frederik brings cake.

06/03: Reading group: we’re reading a 3-page paper by Mesgarani et al. (2014) and a 15-page paper by Llompart and Reinisch (2018). Mads brings cake.

13/03: Talk: Ocke gives a mock talk for NordAc³ tentatively entitled “Processing cost in inter-Scandinavian intelligibility”. Jonas brings cake.

20/03: Talk: Míša, Kamil and Wenyu present their research “Even Americans pre-aspirate”. Anne brings cake.

27/03 Talk: Byunggon presents “Pitch trajectories in American English” (GAMM modelling anticipated!). Sidsel brings cake.

28/03 (at 3pm, in room 1481-324): SeminarAnne Fabricius (RUC) gives a talk on change in Received Pronunciation. Duration: 45 minutes + questions.

29/03 (at 10am–2pm, including 1 hr lunch break, in room 1481-324): WorkshopAnne Fabricius gives a workshop on measuring vowels &  normalisation methods.

1/4: Statistics course with the language & linguistics PhD school. Sign up here!

03/04: Stats talk: Anna gives a statistics talk on effect sizes and posthoc tests (primarily relating to ANOVAs and regression models). Søren brings cake.

10/04: Reading group: we’ll read Riad’s paper on the typology of North Germanic accent.  Anna brings cake.

24/04: Reading group: we read a paper (tba) the a phon-phon interface (Andrea and Míša to recommend and distribute). Andrea brings cake.

01/05: Talk: Andrea presents her (preliminary?) MA thesis results – “An ultrasound study of Danish [ð]”. Yonatan brings cake.

08/5: Guest talk by Nikola Eger (Munich University): “‘haspiration’: processing of German /h/ and /ʔ/ by Italian learners”.

15/05: Talk: Jonas presents preliminary thoughts and/or results from his PhD work. Ocke definitely brings cake.

22/05: Talk: Yonatan gives a mock talk of his ICLaVE presentation on Danish tonal accents. Míša will bring the (yummy, store bought) cake.

4/6: Guest talk (11:00–12:00 in 1481–626) and workshop (14:00–16:00, also in 1481–626): Danielle Turton teaches us forced alignment through DARLA – see blurbs for Danielle’s events here.

13/6: Guest Lecture (11:00–12:00 in 1481–366) by Mirjam Schmaltz (UZH) on Linguistic Attitudes in the Caribbean AND Workshop (13:00–16:00, also in 1481–366) on Attitudes towards World Englishes. AND office hours with Mirjam (10:00–11:00, in 1481–366). See blurbs for Mirjam’s events here!

14/6: Workshop (9:00–12:00 in 1481–366) by Mirjam Schmaltz on perceptual dialectology data collection and processing in dialectology (including GIS systems to create maps). See blurbs for Mirjam’s events here!


Autumn 2018 schedule:

11th of September: Organisational meeting for the autumn semester! NB: we’ll be meeting at 14:15. Enticement in the form of cake provided by Míša (and Anna, optimistically, will bring fruit).

18th of September: Talk by Stefano Coretta – “Vowel duration as a function of consonant gestural timing in Italian and Polish: Evidence from acoustic, ultrasound tongue imaging, and electroglottography” Abstract here. NB! The talk will start at 16:15.

  • Dinner: we’ll eat at Tapashi (a tapas and sushi place at Klostertorvet) at 18pm. Let Míša know by the 13th if you want to join!

19th of September: Workshop – “Analysing curvelinear data: introduction to generalised additive modelling”. Stefano Coretta, University of Manchester.

  • Times: 10:00-11:30, 12:30-15:00
  • Place: 1481, room 324
  • Blurb“Analysing curvelinear data: introduction to generalised additive modelling”. The workshop will introduce generalised additive modelling, a set of statistical techniques for modelling non-linear effects, which are very common in the phonetic sciences. After introducing the theory behind these techniques, we will dive into the practical aspects of how to construct generalised additive models (GAMs) that can inform us about the multi-faceted reality of speech. Each theoretical concept will be reinforced during hands on sessions where you will play with data and code. The workshop will close with a clinic session where you can optionally bring your data to be modelled with GAMs.” The materials we will be using and directions on things to be done before the workshop (software pre-requisites) are available here: https://github.com/stefanocoretta/gamm-workshop.

21 September: Talk by Pavel Šturm “Assimilation of voicing in second language acquisition”. NB! The time for this will be 11:15-12. Abstract hereCake will be brought by Anna.

28 September: Workshop by Míša – “A very gentle intro to graphing in R”. NB! This will be a 90 minute meeting – the time will be 10:30-12Yonatan brings cake. 

5 October: Talk by Fabio Trecca moved to 2nd of November. Jonas, no need to bring cake. 

8 October: Talk by Deepthi Gopal – “What should similarity mean to phonology?” NB! This talk will not be at our normal time and place. We will meet at 10:00 in 1481-424. Sidsel is the cake-bringer.

2 November: Talk by Fabio Trecca from the Puzzle of Danish – he’ll be presenting the project, as well as some of his preliminary results. Byunggon will bring cake.

9 November: Talk by Byunggon – “Measuring vowels acoustically”. Abstract plus code hereOcke brings cake.

16 November: NO MEETING!

23 November: Talk by Christina Rejkjær Dideriksen from the Puzzle of Danish. Christina will be presenting some phon phunny aspects of her part of the project – pitch and vowels! Cake bringer: Jonas.

30 November: Talk by Byurakn Ishkhanyan from the Puzzle of Danish – “What do Danes hear? A categorical perception experiment”. Cake bringer: Sidsel.

7 December: ICPhS session – Anna and Ocke will present their ICPhS papers. Maybe others will join them..? Anna will bring the cake.

19 December: Reading group meeting! The text will be announced in an email, Míša will bring the cake.


Spring 2018 schedule:

9th January: a draft version of Anna‘s LPP talk: “Language and Politics in Northern Ireland”. Cake provided by Krestina (who has her birthday the day before).

23rd January: Ditte shows us data from her current research project, “Sounds in Aarhus Vest”. AND: Reading group “Substance free phonology”, Reiss (2016). [cake volunteer tba]. Access the article at: https://ling.auf.net/lingbuzz/003087

6th February: Organisational meeting for the spring term!  Enticement provided by Anna (cake) and Míša (chocolate).

20th February: Míša: “Hormonal effects on language and speech”. Cake provided by Catharine.

6th March: Maria Grifoll Nogués​, Miriam Espinoza, Melita Smolko, ​and Wenyu Guo: “Pre-aspiration in American English?”. Also: Reading group – “Second Dialect Acquisition: a Sociophonetic Perspective” by Nysz. Cake provided by Lorna.

20th March: Mette: “Challenges in forensic phonetic casework”. Cake provided by Ditte.

3rd of April: Conference pre-talk: Ocke: “L2 speech learning: do cross-language phonetic relationships provide a full account?”. Cake provided by Míša.

17th April: Rasmus: “Plosives in dialect of Danish”. Cake provided by Jonas & Yonatan.

24th April: Reading group: Bybee (2006): “From Usage to Grammar: The Mind’s Response to Repetition” (available online at https://muse.jhu.edu/article/208049/pdf)​. Cake provided by Rasmus.

8th May: Reading group: Fulk (2001): “Conditions for the voicing of Old English fricatives I: phonology”. IJGLSA 6, 1: 55-77 (the file will be circulated before the meeting). Cake provided by Míša & Anna (it’s Anna’s birthday, and Míša’s is the next day).

Additional reading for the curious: Scobbie (2006): “Quasi-phonemic contrast and the fuzzy inventory: examples from Scottish English” (available online at http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.114.5721&rep=rep1&type=pdf). 

22nd May: Conference skills session: we’ll discuss best practices in constructing and delivering oral and poster presentations at conferences (especially useful for those attending the PPDK meeting, which takes place in August). Cake provided by Ocke.

12 June: Linda Polka: Infant talkers and infant listeners. Abstract here. (Cake bringer: Ocke). NB! This talk will be at 15:15 pm in room 324 (1481) – NB changed on 8 June!

19th June: Mads: “An investigation of spectral vowel hyperarticulation in L1 and L2 Clear Speech production​”; and Sandra: “The effects of input quality on the mastery of the English /s/-/z/ contrast by Danish L2-speakers of English”. Cake provided by Søren. NB! This talk will be at 14:00 in our usual room (324).

7th and 13th of August: Mock talks for PPDK (see Previous events)

20th of August at 1:15 pm: Sidsel will have her PhD “temadag”. NB: the location will be 1481, room 366.

21st of August, 2:15 pm: a guest lecture by Puisan Wong (see ad here: Talk Puisan Wong). NB: the lecture will also be taking place in 1481, room 366.